Fracture Fixation and Implants

OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of complications and describe the outcome associated with calcaneal fractures in non-racing dogs and in cats.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective multicenter clinical cohort study.

ANIMALS: Medical records of client-owned dogs and cats (2004-2013).

OBJECTIVE: To compare the biomechanical properties of simulated humeral condylar fractures reduced with one of two screw fixation methods: 3.0 mm headless compression screw (HCS) or 3.5 mm cortical bone screw (CBS) placed in lag fashion.

METHODS: Bilateral humeri were collected from nine canine cadavers. Standardized osteotomies were stabilized with 3.0 mm HCS in one limb and 3.5 mm CBS in the contralateral limb. Condylar fragments were loaded to walk, trot, and failure loads while measuring construct properties and condylar fragment motion.

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical findings and management of tibial fractures in cats in which osteosynthesis failed due to plate bending.

METHODS: Case records and radiographs of cat tibial fracture repairs from five referral centres were reviewed for signalment and to assess incidence of plate failure by bending. Cats that sustained plate bending following plate or plate-rod fixation were reviewed for fracture configuration, repair method, initial postoperative and postfailure tibial alignment, revision treatment and outcome.

OBJECTIVE: To report postoperative complications using a commercially available porous-coated press-fit cementless total hip replacement (THR) system in dogs.

METHODS: Medical records were reviewed for client-owned dogs with hip pathologies requiring THR. A minimum of six-week postoperative orthopaedic examination and orthogonal pelvic radiographs were used to assess outcome and complications in the perioperative period. Referring veterinarian medical records, phone interviews with clients, or both were used to assess long-term functional outcome and complications.

OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to determine: 1) the efficacy of polycaprolactone-g-polyethylene glycol (PCL-g-PEG) and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-g-PEG) hydrogels and an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) as carriers for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), 2) the effect of LPA on bone healing in dogs, and 3) the ideal dose of LPA to maximally stimulate bone healing.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of a silver-impregnated coating against a biofilm-forming strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP).

OBJECTIVE: To compare accuracy and consistency of sacral screw placement in canine pelves treated for sacroiliac luxation with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) or minimally invasive osteosynthesis (MIO) techniques.

OBJECTIVE: To report our experience with the use of contoured mini circular transarticular external skeletal fixators for the management of traumatic tarsal luxations in 15 cats.

BACKGROUND: Hybrid external fixation (HEF) is an emerging technique for fracture stabilization in veterinary orthopedics, but its use has been reported in few papers in the veterinary literature. The linear and circular elements that form hybrid fixators can be connected in a very high number of combinations, and for this reason just referring to HEF without any classification is often misleading about the actual frame structure.

OBJECTIVE: To describe traumatic fracture of the medial coronoid process in dogs as a clinically distinct disease unrelated to congenital elbow dysplasia.