Fracture Fixation and Implants

Aim: The current study was undertaken to evaluate the clinical efficacy of end-threaded intramedullary pinning for management of various long bone fractures in canines.

BACKGROUND: Suspension suture button fixation was frequently used to treat acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, there were many studies reporting about complications and residual horizontal instability after fixation. Our study compared the stability of ACJ after fixation between coracoclavicular (CC) fixation alone and CC fixation combined with ACJ repair by using finite element analysis (FEA).

We compared clinical outcomes after ventral fixation in dogs with atlantoaxial instability (AAI) on the basis of the presence or absence of atlantooccipital overlapping (AOO).

Of 41 dogs diagnosed with AAI and treated ventral fixation, 12 exhibited AOO (AOO group), whereas 29 did not (non-AOO group).

The AOO group had significantly higher neurological scores before (P=0.024) and 1 month after (P=0.033) surgery compared with the non-AOO group; however, no significant differences were observed between the groups 2 months after surgery.

OBJECTIVES: This article aimed to describe olecranon fracture in dogs and cats and their stabilization with tension band wiring or plate osteosynthesis, and to evaluate complications associated with each technique.

METHODS: Medical records of cats and dogs that had been surgically treated for olecranon fractures with either tension band wiring or plate osteosynthesis were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical technique, complications and long-term outcomes were assessed.

OBJECTIVE: To describe a novel Sacroiliac Luxation Instrument System (SILIS™) and its application in minimally invasive osteosynthesis (MIO) of sacroiliac luxations/fractures (SIL/F). The SILIS was designed to provide stable SIL/F reduction and accurate sacral screw placement while reducing personnel exposure to ionizing radiation during intraoperative fluoroscopy.

STUDY DESIGN
: Descriptive, proof of concept cadaveric study.

OBJECTIVES: Retrospective evaluation of repairing distal radial and ulnar fractures in small breed dogs with the Synthes 1.5-mm locking Adaption plate system and compare results in a similar group of patients repaired with the Synthes 2.0-mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP).

OBJECTIVES: To assess screw loosening and pelvic narrowing following the use of locking implants to stabilise ilial body fractures in cats and small dogs.

METHODS: Review of clinical records and post operative and follow up radiography of 12 cats and five small dogs to evaluate accuracy of fracture reduction, screw purchase and subsequent screw loosening and reduction in pelvic diameter.

RESULTS: No screw loosening or reduction in pelvic diameter was observed at follow up.

OBJECTIVE: To report the outcome of mandibular body fractures treated with a wire-reinforced interdental composite splint (WRICS) in small breed dogs.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and safety of pin placement for lateral vertebral stabilization to the reference dorsal stabilization.

STUDY DESIGN: A randomized noninferiority trial.

SAMPLE POPULATION: Twenty Greyhound cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-L6).

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 2.0 mm cancellous screws are superior to 2.0 mm cortical screws when inserted into cancellous and bicortical bone.

STUDY DESIGN: Biomechanical study.