Comparative Study

Authors: S. A. VALLANCE, R. J. W. BELL, M. SPRIET, P. H. KASS, S. M. PUCHALSKI
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: To date, few reports exist comparing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for imaging of the equine distal limb, yet clinicians are required to decide which modality to use regularly.

Objectives: To report and compare anatomic visualisation scores obtained for CT, contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and standing low-field MRI (LFMRI) in the equine foot.

Hypothesis: Anatomic visualisation score discrepancies would exist between CT, CECT and LFMRI.

Authors: Antje Hinz Med Vet, Andrew T. Fischer Jr DVM, Diplomate ACVS
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective
To compare the accuracy of ultrasonographic and radiographic examination for evaluation of articular lesions in horses.
Study Design
Cross-sectional study.
Animals
Horses (n = 137) with articular lesions.
Methods
Radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations of the affected joint(s) were performed before diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopic surgery. Findings were recorded and compared to lesions identified during arthroscopy.
Results

Authors: Els V. Raes, DVM; Eric H. J. Bergman, DVM; Henk van der Veen, DVM; Katrien Vanderperren, DVM, PhD; Elke Van der Vekens, DVM; Jimmy H. Saunders, DVM, PhD
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To compare computed tomography (CT) images of equine tarsi with cross-sectional anatomic slices and evaluate the potential of CT for imaging pathological tarsal changes in horses.

Sample—6 anatomically normal equine cadaveric hind limbs and 4 tarsi with pathological changes.

Authors: M. BIGGI, S. DYSON
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: There are no data concerning the accuracy of conventional and computed or digital radiography for evaluation of the equine foot.

Objectives: To compare conventional film-screen and computed radiography with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of distal border fragments of the navicular bone; and to establish which type of fragment was more likely to be detected radiologically.

Authors: MICHAEL SCHRAMME 1 , ZOLTAN KEREKES 1 , STUART HUNTER 1 , RAPHAEL LABENS 1
Journal: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound

Tendon injuries are common in athletic humans and horses. Ultrasonography is the diagnostic method of choice in horses with tendon injuries but there is increasing application of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to monitor and follow-up tendon healing. A core lesion was created in the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of each forelimb of four horses. One of the four horses was euthanized at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after creation of the lesion. MR examinations of the SDFT were performed immediately post mortem in a 1.5 T Siemens Symphony magnet and compared with histologic findings.

Authors: A. E. Poulin Braim*, R. J. W. Bell, J. A. Textor † , W. Y. Lo, S. M. Puchalski † and L. D. Galuppo †
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

A 2-year-old Thoroughbred filly presented to the William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital at the University of California at Davis for whole body nuclear scintigraphic evaluation after an acute onset of nonweightbearing right hindlimb lameness post race. The use of computed tomography (CT) enabled visualisation of additional pathology that was not initially appreciable using combined imaging modalities of nuclear scintigraphy and digital radiography, which ultimately altered the selected course of treatment.

Authors: Julien Olive, DMV, MSc; Marc-André d'Anjou, DMV; Kate Alexander, DMV, MS; Guy Beauchamp, PhD; Christine L. Theoret, DMV, PhD
Journal: American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective—To evaluate the ability of signal attenuation–based quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (QMRI) to estimate subchondral bone mineral density (BMD) as assessed via quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in osteoarthritic joints of horses.

Sample Population—20 metacarpophalangeal joints from 10 horse cadavers.

Category: Bone - Comparative Study - CT - Equine - Imaging - MRI
Authors: Géraldine Bolen DVM, MS, dipECVDI, Fabrice Audigié DVM, PhD, Mathieu Spriet DVM, dipECVDI, dipACVR, Filip Vandenberghe DVM and Valeria Busoni DVM, PhD, dipECVDI
Journal: Journal of Equine Veterinary Science

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the investigation of foot pain in horses. The aim of this study was to qualitatively compare ex-vivo MR images of the same equine feet obtained at three magnetic field strengths: 0.27, 1.5, and 3 tesla (T). Ten cadaver feet were used. All feet were imaged with two high-field systems (3T, 1.5T) and with a low-field (LF) system at 0.27 T designed for standing horses. Images were acquired using similar pulse sequences in all 3 MR units.

Authors: RAPHAEL LABENS 1 , MICHAEL C. SCHRAMME 1 , IAN D. ROBERTSON 1 , DONALD E. THRALL 1 , W. RICH REDDING 1
Journal: Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound

Sonography is commonly used for diagnosis of desmopathy of the proximal part of the suspensory ligament in horses. However, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been stated to be superior for detecting disease and localizing lesions. In this retrospective study of 39 horses or 46 hind limbs with lameness due to proximal plantar metatarsal pain, the clinical and diagnostic findings are discussed and sonography and MR imaging compared for examination of the proximal part of the suspensory ligament.

Authors: McLellan, J.; Plevin, S.; Hammock, P.D.; BonenClark, G.
Journal: Equine Veterinary Education

Patellar chondromalacia is rarely reported in the horse. In this study, several noninvasive diagnostic modalities were combined to diagnose patellar chondromalacia in a horse, later confirmed by arthroscopy. Radiography failed to demonstrate pathology; nuclear scintigraphy localised the disease process to the left femoropatellar region; and ultrasonography identified pathological changes within the affected joint. It is possible that this disease is under-reported in the literature due to the difficulty in accurately diagnosing the condition.