Comparative Study

Authors: A. C. Young, A. N. Dimock, S. M. Puchalski, B. Murphy and M. Spriet
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Summary

Reasons for performing study

Osseous resorption of the flexor surface of the distal phalanx of the horse has been identified previously using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; however, little is known about the prevalence and characteristics of this lesion.

Objectives

To establish the MR prevalence of resorptive lesions in the flexor surface of the distal phalanx and identify concurrent lesions associated with this finding and associations between the MR and radiographic findings.

Methods

Authors: J. Lacy Kamm, Laurie R. Goodrich, Natasha M. Werpy and C. Wayne McIlwraith
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

Objective

To describe regions of the thoracic and pelvic limb proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints that are arthroscopically accessible and identify soft tissue structures that should be avoided during arthroscope and instrument placement.

Study Design

Experimental ex vivo descriptive study.

Animals

Horses (n = 15).

Methods

Authors: Michael Schramme, Anne Josson, Keith Linder
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

The suspensory ligament is difficult to image accurately, partly because it contains ligamentous fibers, as well as noncollagenous adipose and muscle tissue in the normal horse. Our hypothesis was that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging would be more accurate than ultrasonography in identifying the size of the suspensory ligament and the presence and size of noncollagenous tissues within the ligament. Eleven horses were used for ultrasonographic and MR imaging and histologic evaluation of the rear suspensory ligament.

Authors: Alexander J. Daniel, BVetMed; Carter E. Judy, DVM, DACVS; Mark C. Rick, DVM; Travis C. Saveraid, DVM, DACVR; Douglas J. Herthel, DVM
Journal: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—To describe pathological findings identified with MRI in the distal tarsal bones of horses with unilateral hind limb lameness attributable to tarsal pain and to compare the usefulness of MRI with that of radiography and nuclear scintigraphy in evaluation of this region.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—20 lame horses.

Authors: S. A. VALLANCE, R. J. W. BELL, M. SPRIET, P. H. KASS, S. M. PUCHALSKI
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: No previous study compares computed tomography (CT), contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) and standing low-field magnetic resonance imaging (LFMRI) to detect lesions in horses with lameness localised to the foot. This study will help clinicians understand the limitations of these techniques.

Objectives: To determine if CT, CECT and LFMRI would identify lesions within the distal limb and document discrepancies with lesion distribution and lesion classification.

Category: Comparative Study - CT - Equine - MRI
Authors: MARIEKE ZIMMERMAN, SUE DYSON and RACHEL MURRAY
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Back pain is common in horses, but there has been no large-scale in-depth study describing radiographic changes of the spinous processes, the relationship between radiographic and scintigraphic findings, and the effect of size, age, breed, or discipline.

Authors: CAROLINA I. URRACA DEL JUNCO, DARREN J. SHAW, MARTIN P. WEAVER and TOBIAS SCHWARZ
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Magnetic susceptibility artifacts as a result of metal debris from shoeing are a common problem in magnetic resonance imaging of the equine foot. Our purpose was to determine the suitability of radiography as a screening tool for the presence and location of metallic particles in the equine foot and to predict the size of the resultant magnetic susceptibility artifact. Radiography had 100% sensitivity for detection of metal particles ≥1 mm diameter.

Authors: SUE DYSON, ANNAMARIA NAGY, RACHEL MURRAY
Journal: Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound

Eight sports horses with unilateral (4) or bilateral (3) forelimb or unilateral hindlimb (1) lameness had subtle radiologic abnormalities of the subchondral bone of the sagittal groove of the proximal phalanx associated with moderate or intense increased radiopharmaceutical uptake. High-field or low-field magnetic resonance (MR) imaging confirmed the presence of a fissure fracture or subchondral and trabecular bone trauma. Seven of eight lesions were located approximately midway between the dorsal and palmar cortices of the proximal phalanx; the eighth was sited more dorsally.

Authors: Thomas O'Brien, Theresa A. Baker, Sabrina H. Brounts, Susannah J. Sample, Mark D. Markel, Mary C. Scollay, Patricia Marquis and Peter Muir
Journal: Veterinary Surgery

To compare digital radiography (DR), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of pathology of the distal aspect of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) and to assess whether arthrography would improve detection of articular cartilage or subchondral bone cracking.
Study Design
Cross-sectional study.
Sample Population
Limb specimens from 17 Thoroughbred horses after catastrophic injury and 4 age-matched control horses.
Methods

Authors: M. F. BARRETT, D. D. FRISBIE, C. W. McILWRAITH, N. M. WERPY
Journal: Equine Veterinary Journal

Reasons for performing study: While descriptions of the visible soft tissues of the femorotibial joints exist for both arthroscopy and ultrasonography, there are few examples in the literature that discuss in detail the combined findings of these modalities.

Objectives: To further elucidate the ultrasonographic and arthroscopic boundaries of the normal equine femorotibial joints and improve the understanding of the benefits and limitations of each individual modality.