Osteoarthritis

Authors: Fitzpatrick N, Yeadon R, van Terheijden C, Smith TJ.
Journal: VCOT

Objective: To describe the clinical application of osteochondral autograft transfer procedure for the treatment of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the canine medial femoral condyle and to report clinical and force plate outcomes. Methods: Osteochondral autograft transfer (OATS™ Arthrex, Naples FL, USA) instrumentation was employed in six stifle joints of five dogs. Clinical examination was performed preoperatively and at two to three weeks, six to eight weeks, 12-18 weeks and at >22 months postoperatively.

Authors: Vaccaro C, Busetto R, Bernardini D, Anselmi C, Zotti A.
Journal: AJVR

Objective-To evaluate the precision and accuracy of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) by use of mean gray value (MGV) on digitalized and digital images of conventional and digital radiographs, respectively, of ex vivo bovine and equine bone specimens in relation to the gold-standard technique of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Sample-Left and right metatarsal bones from 11 beef cattle and right femurs from 2 horses. Procedures-Bovine specimens were imaged by use of conventional radiography, whereas equine specimens were imaged by use of computed radiography (digital radiography).

Authors: Bennett D, Zainal Ariffin SM, Johnston P.
Journal: J Feline Med Surg

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common in the cat and in many cases is associated with significant long-term pain, which limits mobility and activity, and severely compromises the animal's quality of life. CLINICAL CHALLENGES: The treatment of chronic arthritic pain is a major challenge and many analgesic drugs used in other species are not licensed, not available or not tested for use in the cat.

Authors: Bennett D, Zainal Ariffin SM, Johnston P.
Journal: J Feline Med Surg

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common, particularly in older cats, but its clinical significance has largely gone unrecognised until recently. As in other species, OA is often painful and appropriate treatment is required to improve the animal's quality of life. Most cases appear to be primary or idiopathic. It is important for the clinician to actively seek these cases in the practice population. CLINICAL CHALLENGES: The recognition of chronic arthritic pain is a major challenge since most cats will not exhibit lameness.

Authors: Proks P, Necas A, Stehlik L, Srnec R, Griffon DJ.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To quantify humeroulnar incongruity on elbow radiographs in Labrador Retrievers with or without medial coronoid disease (MCD).
STUDY DESIGN:
Retrospective study of 92 elbows.
SAMPLE POPULATION:
Radiographic projections of elbow joints from Labrador Retrievers with MCD (n = 42 elbows; 26 dogs) and without MCD (n = 50 elbows; 25 dogs).
PROCEDURE:

Authors: Burton NJ, Owen MR, Kirk LS, Toscano MJ, Colborne GR.
Journal: Vet Surg

OBJECTIVE:
To investigate, using objective gait analysis, the long-term outcome of dogs with medial coronoid process disease (MCPD) treated with conservative management (CM) versus arthroscopic treatment (AT).
STUDY DESIGN:
Prospective clinical trial.
ANIMALS:
Dogs (n = 20) with unilaterally confirmed MCPD.
METHODS:

Authors: Krontveit RI, Trangerud C, Nødtvedt A, Dohoo I, Moe L, Sævik BK.
Journal: Vet J

The aim of the study was to measure the effect of radiological hip and elbow dysplasia status and breed on overall survival in a cohort of four large dog breeds in Norway. Privately owned dogs of the Newfoundland (NF), Labrador Retriever (LR), Leonberger (LEO), and Irish Wolfhound (IW) breeds were followed prospectively from birth to 10years of age. The age of death/euthanasia was registered. A total of 501 dogs from 103 litters were enrolled. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to describe breed differences in survival times.

Authors: Helia Zamprogno a, Jon Hash a, Don A. Hulse b, B. Duncan X. Lascelles a
Journal: Vet J

The objective of this study was to develop a surgical technique for sensory denervation of the canine elbow joint and to assess the effects of denervation on limb function in normal dogs. Twenty cadavers (40 elbows) were used to characterize innervation and design the surgical protocol which was tested in 13 cadavers (26 normal elbows). The effect of denervation on limb function was assessed in vivo in four dogs with the elbow randomly selected for the procedure.

Authors: Farrell M, Lindsay S, Johnson V, Child G.
Journal: VCOT

An eight-month-old mixed-breed dog was presented with a history of sudden onset pelvic limb lameness. Radiographic and computed tomographic examinations demonstrated an osteolytic process involving the lumbar spine and pelvis. A comprehensive work-up including serial radiographic skeletal survey, biopsy, routine laboratory investigation and evaluation of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels failed to reveal any underlying cause for the osteolysis.

Authors: Butler JR, Syrcle JA, McLaughlin RM, Elder SH.
Journal: VCOT

OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate the effect of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) and meniscal release on cranial-caudal and axial rotational displacement during early, middle and late stance phases in the canine cranial cruciate ligament- (CCL) deficient stifle.
STUDY DESIGN:
In vitro biomechanical study.
METHODS: