Fracture Fixation and Implants

OBJECTIVES: Retrospective evaluation of repairing distal radial and ulnar fractures in small breed dogs with the Synthes 1.5-mm locking Adaption plate system and compare results in a similar group of patients repaired with the Synthes 2.0-mm limited contact-dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP).

OBJECTIVES: To assess screw loosening and pelvic narrowing following the use of locking implants to stabilise ilial body fractures in cats and small dogs.

METHODS: Review of clinical records and post operative and follow up radiography of 12 cats and five small dogs to evaluate accuracy of fracture reduction, screw purchase and subsequent screw loosening and reduction in pelvic diameter.

RESULTS: No screw loosening or reduction in pelvic diameter was observed at follow up.

OBJECTIVE: To report the outcome of mandibular body fractures treated with a wire-reinforced interdental composite splint (WRICS) in small breed dogs.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective case series.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the accuracy and safety of pin placement for lateral vertebral stabilization to the reference dorsal stabilization.

STUDY DESIGN: A randomized noninferiority trial.

SAMPLE POPULATION: Twenty Greyhound cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-L6).

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether 2.0 mm cancellous screws are superior to 2.0 mm cortical screws when inserted into cancellous and bicortical bone.

STUDY DESIGN: Biomechanical study.

This retrospective study evaluated complication rates for radius and ulna fractures in small breed dogs in which 1.5 mm to 2.7 mm cuttable bone plates were used for internal fixation. The medical records of all cases from 2004 to 2011 that were presented to our clinic were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were: dogs with body weight < 9 kg, fracture of the radius and ulna with open reduction, and internal fixation utilizing a cuttable bone plate. T

OBJECTIVE: To compare the biomechanical properties of using an interfragmentary 1.6 mm Kirschner wire or a 2.7 mm reconstruction plate as adjunctive epicondylar stabilization in simulated comminuted lateral unicondylar humeral fractures stabilized with a transcondylar 4.5 mm cortical screw.

STUDY DESIGN: Cadaveric biomechanical assessment.

SAMPLE POPULATION: Paired humeri harvested from 9 young, skeletally mature dogs.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of placing bi-cortical cortex (B-cort) or mono-cortical locking screws (M-lock) in a plate-rod construct applied to the feline tibia in combination with different intramedullary (IM) pins.

OBJECTIVE: To compare stiffness and resistance to cyclic fatigue of two 3.5-mm locking system plate-rod constructs applied to an experimentally created fracture gap in femurs of canine cadavers. SAMPLE 20 femurs from cadavers of 10 mixed-breed adult dogs.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate biomechanical properties of intact feline mandibles, compared with those for mandibles with an experimentally created osteotomy that was stabilized with 1 of 2 internal fixation configurations.

SAMPLE: 20 mandibles from 10 adult feline cadavers.