Effect of fixation method on postoperative complication rates after surgical stabilization of lateral humeral condylar fractures in dogs

<p>Karen L. Perry, Mieghan Bruce, Samantha Woods, Clare Davies, Laura A. Heaps and Gareth I. Arthurs. Vet Surg. 2015 Feb; 44 (2) 246–255</p>

OBJECTIVES: To assess the impact of stabilization method on the complication rate after lateral humeral condylar fracture (LHCF) repair.

STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective multicenter clinical cohort study.

ANIMALS: Dogs (n = 151) with LHCF.

METHODS: Medical records (2004–2012) were reviewed for dogs that had surgical repair of LHCF. Data retrieved included signalment, cause of fracture, evidence of incomplete ossification of the humeral condyle, occurrence of postoperative complications, presence of supracondylar comminution preoperatively, and persistence of an intracondylar fissure postoperatively. Outcome was assessed based on the most recent data available and graded as excellent, good, fair, or poor.

RESULTS: LHCF (n = 135) were evaluated in 132 dogs; 61 fractures were stabilized using a transcondylar screw and supracondylar K-wire, 13 using a transcondylar screw and supracondylar screw, and 61 using a transcondylar screw and lateral epicondylar plate. Major complications were significantly (P = .01) more common after stabilization using a transcondylar screw and supracondylar K-wire (28%) than in dogs where a supracondylar screw or lateral epicondylar plate were used (11%). Cases that had postoperative complications were significantly (P = .02) more likely to have a poor outcome.

CONCLUSIONS: LHCF stabilized using a transcondylar screw and supracondylar K-wire are more likely to have major complications resulting in a poorer outcome than cases stabilized using a supracondylar screw or lateral epicondylar plate.